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Eight Recent YA Fantasy Novels with Handicapped Main Characters

Eight Recent YA Fantasy Novels with Handicapped Main Characters

When I was writing The Wysman, I realized that fantasy novels in which a handicapped teen was allowed to be the central character were few and far between. I occasionally saw them as sidekicks, but not as the heroes and heroines. This list includes as many more recent books as I could find in which the handicapped character is the star. I haven’t read them all, but I tried to get some sense of them from their descriptions and reviews….

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Power in a fantasy novel

Power in a fantasy novel

Power is a ubiquitous theme in fantasy. Over and over, we see questions about who has power, how they got it, and whether they wield it wisely. The Quest for Political Power One of the most common elements in a fantasy plot is a struggle over who should rule the kingdom. That quest for political power is often backed up by military might, i.e. physical power. So there are lots of exciting battles, ranging from single combat to large scale…

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Cover Blurbs

Cover Blurbs

Cover blurbs are always tricky to write, which is why it’s so useful to have a collaborative approach without too many cooks spoiling the broth. In this post, I’m going to take you through the steps of editing, tightening and polishing the blurb for my latest book, The Trickster. If you watch people in bookstores, you see that a book catches their attention, either from the cover (if it’s shelved face out) or the title (if only the spine shows)….

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Creating culture to help the story

Creating culture to help the story

Note: This post originally appeared as a Big Idea post on John Scalzi’s blog, “Whatever.” My thanks to him for hosting it. Not long ago, I realized that I always wind up writing about family, whether I intend to or not. That may be because I write YA and my characters are breaking from their birth families. But themes of family can work even with adult characters. We humans generally need the support of other who love us, most commonly…

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Getting the Most from Your Critique Group: Part II

Getting the Most from Your Critique Group: Part II

Because I have a new book coming out on March X, my publisher asked me to write a post for the Inspired Quill blog on how to get the most from a critique group. I’ve belonged to a lot of different crit groups over the years and was happy to share whatever bits of wisdom I’d picked up. After I wrote that post, though, I realized that I’d only talked about how to get the most from being critiqued. But…

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Advice to Myself: Write True

Advice to Myself: Write True

Sometimes I put sticky notes to myself around my computer screen. They’re advice I know I need to write well. One I have up often is “Write True.” To Write True Is To Write Well The value of writing true has been brought home to me by listening to audio books as I drive. In them, I find that good writing overcomes a lot of drawbacks. By “good writing,” I don’t mean fancy writing. I mean things like interesting voice…

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Rising Action: An Essential Element of Plot

Rising Action: An Essential Element of Plot

I recently read Lionheart by Ben Kane. This is historical fiction that is, unsurprisingly, about Richard the Lionhearted. The book is well written enough that I finished it. However, reading it made me realize the problems presented by some kinds of plot lines when the author tries to achieve rising action. Repeated plot elements Richard the Lionhearted is a fascinating historical character. We’re probably all familiar with him at least from tales about Robin Hood, who struggled against oppression in…

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My Ten Favorite 2020 Reads

My Ten Favorite 2020 Reads

Here are the ten books I enjoyed reading most in 2020. Most of them were published in 2020 also, but some are earlier. I tried to explain what made each book special to me, but sometimes the appeal of a book is mysterious. Bitterblue by Kristin Cashore I reread this, the third book in Cashore’s Graceling series, because a sequel is coming out in January. I enjoyed it more this time that I did the first time I read it, I…

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What makes an outstanding book?

What makes an outstanding book?

Every year, we see a spate of lists of the best or outstanding books for that year. Why do some books land in that category while other perfectly fine books don’t?  What makes a book outstanding? Outstanding can, of course, mean different things. Most easily it means big sales. If that’s the case then a lot of readers responded to that book, which is not to be sneezed at. A second meaning for “outstanding” might be that while the book…

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Teacher’s Guide for FINDERS KEEPER

Teacher’s Guide for FINDERS KEEPER

Finders Keepers is designed for middle-grade readers (10 and up). Given how stressed out teachers are these days, I offer this teacher’s guide. I put the questions together with help from my daughter-in-law who is a reading specialist. I hope they’re useful to you. SYNOPSIS A whisper in the dark draws 12-year-old Cade to a hole in the paving where he finds a beautiful triangular stone. When he takes it home as a gift for Mum, she and his older…

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